Corsair K70 RGB Pro review: a state-of-the-art mechanical gaming keyboard

Ergonomics

With the K70 RGB Pro, Corsair anchors itself in the codes of its series of keyboards gaming, but we feel that the design has been updated with a slightly more modern aesthetic. The keyboard is more sober – which is not displeasing to us – and completely matte black. It is mainly made of plastic, but the chassis is covered with a brushed aluminum plate which gives it good rigidity. Even though it doesn’t have dedicated macro keys on the side, it’s still quite imposing on a desk with overall dimensions of 44.4 x 16.6 x 4cm. Its wrist rest adds another 8.2 cm in width, which is not negligible.

The K70 RGB Pro takes up space.

The K70 RGB Pro takes up space.

© The Digital

This remains essential, because it makes it possible to raise the hands in front of the consequent height of the keys. It is quite comfortable and its rubber coating is soft. However, it is very rigid and we personally prefer the more padded wrist rests. It is also magnetized, which is really practical to put it on or detach it from the frame, without complicating the work with clips.

The wrist rest is magnetic, but very rigid.

The wrist rest is magnetic, but very rigid.

© The Digital

Overall, this keyboard is very well built and the finishes are there. We find there the keys without edges which do not completely encompass the mechanical switches, letting the light of the backlight pass through. On this Pro model, the keys are slightly grainy and grip the fingers perfectly. They are also well stabilized and made of double shot PBT (double injection), a molding process that gives them a much longer lifespan than conventional ABS plastic. The symbols should therefore not disappear any time soon.

The borderless keys let the LED light through clearly.

The borderless keys let the LED light through clearly.

© The Digital

On the top of the keyboard, we find in the upper left corner the three keys that allow you to change the profile of the backlight, to modify its brightness (on six levels) and to block the Windows key so as not to activate it in full session of game. In the center, we discover the Corsair logo and the various luminous pictograms which show which keys are activated (Shift, Mute, Windows key deactivated, etc.). Finally, the right part is reserved for dedicated multimedia keys, very practical when you want to listen to music. The volume adjustment wheel is still useful and its metal construction makes it particularly solid and fluid.

Dedicated multimedia keys.

Dedicated multimedia keys.

© The Digital

This K70 does not have dedicated macro keys, which some may regret. The rest of the keys are otherwise very classic, the functions F1 to F12 being left empty to set the shortcuts of your choice in the iCue home software. This also makes it possible to manage all of the backlighting with a multitude of light effects and an infinity of color combinations, or even to save different profiles. Alas, we had to launch the software each time the computer started for our pre-recorded profile to launch, otherwise the default lighting remained in place.

iCue software.

iCue software.

© The Digital

Another interesting point on the K70 RGB Pro, the braided USB-C to USB-A cable is now detachable, which allows it to be replaced in the event of a problem and to move the keyboard without having to unplug everything. Next to it is another originality of this Pro model: a “tournament” mode activation button which offers to block personalized macros in accordance with the rules that apply in official competition, and to activate static lighting so as not to be bothered by light effects. This mode seems anecdotal to us, especially since it will be reserved for a handful of players.

The detachable cable and the “tournament” button.

The detachable cable and the “tournament” button.

© The Digital

Finally, there are gutters under the chassis that allow you to slide the USB cable in order to bring it out on the desired side, as well as non-slip pads to keep the keyboard in place. Retractable and adjustable feet on two levels are also present to raise the back of the keyboard if necessary.

The feet are retractable and the cable can be slipped into a gutter.

The feet are retractable and the cable can be slipped into a gutter.

© The Digital

Editor's Rating: 4 out of 5

Struck

Our test model has Cherry MX Speed ​​switches, excellent switches linear that offer unparalleled responsiveness with an activation point at 1.2 mm for a total stroke of 4 mm. It is therefore the fastest version of the K70 RGB Pro, but two others are also marketed: one with Cherry MX Red and their 2 mm activation point found on many keyboards gaming ; another version with Cherry MX Brown, similar models, but tactile (we feel when the key reaches its activation point). We appreciate anyway that the choice is given to the user, even if the fans of blue switches clicky will be disappointed to see them to absent subscribers.

Cherry MX Speed ​​switches.

Cherry MX Speed ​​switches.

© The Digital

The Cherry MX Speeds are perfectly integrated here and the keyboard offers a very lively rebound, obviously suitable for nervous video games such as FPS. Be careful, when it comes to typing text, the responsiveness can be confusing and it will take some getting used to. At first, this can lead to a lot of typos. These switches are guaranteed for 100 million activations, ie an excellent longevity.

If the keyboard is generally free from defects, we can address a serious criticism to it concerning its frankly marked resonance. With each keystroke, you will hear big “boing” of metal springs, which are the prerogative of many keyboards gaming, but here resolutely unpleasant to the ear – only headphones will be able to relieve us of this nuisance. At this price, we would have liked Corsair to work to limit this resonance, using attenuating foam for example.

The keyboard in full action makes noise.

The keyboard in full action makes noise.

© The Digital

The keyboard incorporates Corsair’s own Axon technology, which gives it a monster polling rate of 8000 Hz when most models cap out at 1000 Hz. distinguish between these two rates. Finally, it obviously has the NKRO (N-Key Rollover) which allows you to press as many keys as you want at the same time, as well as theanti ghosting in order to avoid any misinterpretation.

Strong points

  • Impeccable finishes.

  • Dedicated media keys.

  • Quality key-by-key backlighting.

  • Very responsive Cherry MX Speed ​​switches.

  • Double shot PBT keys.

  • Detachable USB cable.

  • Adjustable feet on two levels.

Weak points

  • Very marked chassis resonance.

  • No pass-through USB port.

  • Rigid wrist rest.

Conclusion

we tested we liked
Global mark

Editor's Rating: 4 out of 5

How does grading work?

The K70 RGB Pro benefits from an excellent build quality and many interesting elements, in particular a practical dedicated multimedia shutter, a complete and well finished key-by-key backlighting, double-injected PBT keys and a detachable braided cable in addition a magnetic palm rest. In addition, its responsiveness is impressive, which fits perfectly with nervous video game use, but we regret a strong resonance of the chassis which can quickly weigh on the ears.

Sub Notes

  • Ergonomics

    Editor's Rating: 5 out of 5

  • Struck

    Editor's Rating: 4 out of 5

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